Background

Enertechnos is a pioneering clean-tech company dedicated to enabling ‘better electricity’

Electricity Generation and the Grid

Since the company’s foundation in 2014, Enertechnos’s core activity has been and remains the development and industrialisation of a new form of cable for transmission and distribution networks, called Capacitive Transfer System (CTS).

Electrical energy needs to be transmitted and distributed from the point of generation to the point of use in the most cost-effective way, taking into account the geographical, topographical and political barriers between those two points. By and large, electrical energy cannot be stored except on a very local and usually low power basis (for example, using batteries).  As a result, electricity is normally generated in “real-time” and transmitted directly from the point of generation to the point of use, taking into account fluctuating demand.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), losses in grids resulted in around 1 gigatonne of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2) emissions in 2018. They estimate that reducing worldwide losses towards efficient levels of around 5% from as much as 18% in some regions today could reduce these emissions by over 400 Mt CO2.

The Bloomberg New Energy Report highlights that by 2050, peak energy demand will grow 1.7x 2020 levels. T&D losses in 2040 are equivalent to the entire forecast demand by the global fleet of electric vehicles (EVs) in that year.

Options to reduce these losses include replacing transformers and power lines, and optimising the reactive power profile.

Subsequent testing and modelling has shown that not only can CTS reduce losses by up to 47%, it can also provide more capacity per unit of conductor, assist with harmonic filtration and help to provide reactive support in grids.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), losses in grids resulted in around 1 gigatonne of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2) emissions in 2018. We estimate that reducing worldwide losses towards efficient levels of around 5% from as much as 18% in some regions today could reduce these emissions by over 400 Mt CO2.

Options to reduce these losses include replacing transformers and power lines, and optimising the reactive power profile.

The Bloomberg New Energy Report highlights that by 2050, peak energy demand will grow 1.7x 2020 levels. T&D losses in 2040 are equivalent to the entire forecast demand by the global fleet of electric vehicles (EVs) in that year.

Subsequent testing and modelling has shown that not only can CTS reduce losses by up to 47%, it can also provide more capacity per unit of conductor, assist with harmonic filtration and help to provide reactive support in grids.

Smart Grids

In recent years billions of dollars have been committed globally to a renewal and expansion of the electrical grid system and the development of ‘smart grids’ which will distribute electrical power more efficiently.

Smart grid initiatives seek to improve operations, maintenance and planning by ensuring that each component of the electric grid can effectively both ‘talk and listen’. This leads to increased efficiencies through demand-side management and improved up-time by automatically communicating potential faults to control centres.

Existing high voltage wire and cable systems of the type used in present-day grids and foreseen for use in smart grids lose on average circa 10.6% (globally) of the power transmitted as system losses.

The Future of CTS

In the power industry, the term “cable” has a particular meaning referring only to encased conductors that are placed sub-surface, either in a trench or conduit on land or on or beneath the seabed when submarine. While CTS is named as a “cable” it could also be suspended from pylons, albeit potentially requiring much smaller ones than current technology, to replace existing overhead lines (“OHL”).

Smart Grids

In recent years billions of dollars have been committed globally to a renewal and expansion of the electrical grid system and the development of ‘smart grids’ which will distribute electrical power more efficiently.

Smart grid initiatives seek to improve operations, maintenance and planning by ensuring that each component of the electric grid can effectively both ‘talk and listen’. This leads to increased efficiencies through demand-side management and improved up-time by automatically communicating potential faults to control centres.

Existing high voltage wire and cable systems of the type used in present-day grids and foreseen for use in smart grids lose on average circa 10.6% (globally) of the power transmitted as system losses.

The Future of CTS

In the power industry, the term “cable” has a particular meaning referring only to encased conductors that are placed sub-surface, either in a trench or conduit on land or on or beneath the seabed when submarine. While CTS is named as a “cable” it could also be suspended from pylons, albeit potentially requiring much smaller ones than current technology, to replace existing overhead lines (“OHL”).